About the Jute Plant

The rediscovery of a miraculous plant

The plant kingdom offers an almost limitless variety of different medicinal plants, most of them still undiscovered and hidden in remote areas of the world. Some of these medicinal plants have been used for generations, but their healing properties have remained surprisingly hidden from us.

This is what happened to the jute plant (Corchorus olitorius), one of the most important fibre plants in the world. The jute plant is known to most people for its fibre products such as jute bags. However, it is hardly known in this country that the dried leaves of the young jute plant have an extremely high nutritional value. The jute plant is native to almost all tropical and subtropical regions worldwide and has been used for centuries for various purposes.

Worldwide, the leaves of the jute plant have been used for centuries as a medicine in the traditional growing areas. Herbalists used the leaves and infusions preventively and for the treatment of various ailments. The legend has it that Cleopatra used jute leaves and jute infusions in ancient Egypt to preserve her youthful appearance. Nowadays in Bangladesh, many North African and Arabic countries the fresh or dried jute leaves are used as a vegetable for cooking and are known there under the name Molokhia or Mulukhiyah. The medicinal effect of jute leaves has almost been forgotten - almost nowhere in the traditional growing areas of the world is jute still used for medicinal purposes. Until now. For some time now, the jute plant has been experiencing a kind of resurrection worldwide. In addition to the use of the jute fibre for fabrics of all kinds and the jute leaves as a vegetable, the jute leaves are now also increasingly used for medical purposes.

Minerals & Trace Elements

Jute leaves have a very high mineral content. Especially iron, calcium, potassium and magnesium are found in high amounts, as are the trace elements zinc and selenium. Thus jute leaves cover the complete basic mineral spectrum.

Polyphenols for the Immune System

Jute leaves are rich in secondary plant compounds with antioxidant potential. Especially chlorogenic acid, astragaline, phloricine, procyanidine B1 and miquelianine are found in high concentrations.

Vitamin E, K1 & B2

Jute leaves have high contents of Vitamin K1 (Phylloquinone), Vitamin E (Tocopherol) and Vitamin B2 (Riboflavin).

Through the beneficial combination of minerals, secondary plant compounds, vitamins and antioxidants, jute products – taken daily – can make an important contribution to your well-being.

Jute Leaf Infusion: a caffeine free tea innovation

Jute tea combines properties that have rarely been found in this combination before: a taste similar to green tea, extraordinarily rich in nutrients, but without caffeine. The high mineral content of the jute leaves makes jute tea an alkaline herbal tea, in addition to the high content of phenols with high antioxidant potential.

The jute leaves, which are rich in minerals, result in a basic immune tea with many antioxidants when prepared correctly. As a mono herb, jute herbal tea is exceptionally digestible and is a delicious alternative to the well-known basic teas.

Da Juteblätter von Natur aus kein Koffein enthalten, kann Jute-Tee auch in den Abendstunden und von Kindern bedenkenlos getrunken werden.

Jute tea is obtained from the leaves of the young jute plant. The leaves, which are about 45 days old, are harvested, air-dried and then processed. The drying process, which is gentle on the nutrients, is carried out in a centuries-old, traditional manner.

Jute Powder: a unique range of nutrients

Jute powder provides all the nutrients of the jute leaf. The powder of the jute leaves supplies a spectrum of health-active vital substances rarely found in this range: more iron than Moringa, more vitamin E than wheatgrass, more vitamin K than rose hips and more calcium than baobab. All this is 100 % purely vegetable and without additives.

Like jute tea, jute powder is obtained from the leaves of the young jute plant. The leaves, which are about 45 days old, are harvested, air-dried and then processed. The drying process, which is gentle on the nutrients, is carried out in a centuries-old, traditional manner.